Tag Archives: granny half square

Granny What Now?

9 Feb

Did you know that there’s a difference between a Granny Triangle and a Granny Half-Square?

You did? Smarty Pants.  =)

For the rest of you, check this out:

 

Granny Half Square

Granny Half Squares are flat on the bottom and involve adding an extra dc into the first and last “granny group” of each row.  For a refresher course, check out my ridiculously awesome tutorial!

 

Granny Triangles, on the other hand, are worked without turning the piece, and have three distinct roundy edges (and yes, that’s the scientific term):

 

Granny Triangle

For an awesome Granny Triangle tutorial, check out Carina’s craft blog – she’s got pictures and everything!

Nina is extremely smart, as you may know, and was able to correctly identify the Granny Triangle on her first attempt!

 

Smartest. Kitten. Ever.

 

In case you were hoping for a kitten-less shot (though I can’t imagine why), here you go:

AND… in case you were hoping for a bit more humor in today’s post, I just want you all to know that WordPress recommended I tag Cloris Leachman, the United States, and Constellation Maps in this post.  Then, when I typed those three things, it updated my recommended tags to include Go Daddy and a related article about a Grannie attacking thug bikers (which I’ve included below).  WordPress ROCKS.

 

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Half a Square, Squared. Sort of.

13 Jan

A helpful tutorial for your hooking pleasure, which, if you were to want to make tomorrow’s Free Pattern Friday, you might want to pay attention to…dun da da DUUUUUUUN:

The Half Granny Square

1. Start by chaining 6 & joining with a sl st to make a ring.

 

try not to let your kitten eat your crochet hook.

2. ch3, 3dc, ch3, 4dc (YES, I said 4!)

 

aww, isn't it cute?

3. ch3, 3dc in the space between the first 2 st of the previous row, (3dc, ch3, 3dc) in next sp, 4(YES, 4!)dc in the space between the last 2 st of the previous row.

4. forget to take a picture of step three.

5. do the whole thing over again — 4 dc in the spaces between the first & last stitches, 3dc in all the other spaces, & treat the top as your corner (3dc, ch3, 3dc).

 

it's the trifecta of triforce triatha-chets (except for that pesky 4dc shell on each end)...

6.  repeat the pattern over and over and over and over and over and…

 

three is a magic number (except when it's 4).

7…over and over and over and… well, you get the idea.  If you make this big enough it will turn into a pretty sweet looking shawl.  Mine is almost big enough for the Travelocity gnome (oh yeah, he wears shawls!  Airplanes get cold!)  Just sayin’.